World Water Works Unveils New inDENSE™ Technology

Enhanced bio-p and superior settleability technology now available


Press Releases - 2016-10-12

OKLAHOMA CITY – World Water Works, Inc., a manufacturer of specialized advanced water treatment solutions, has recently announced its launch of the inDENSE™ technology. World Water Work’s inDENSE technology solves the issue of floating or bulking sludge affecting the treatment capacity and performance of conventional activated sludge process.

InDENSE achieves bio-p without process change and dramatically improves sludge volume index (SVI). This technology is the solution for poor settling mixed liquor suspended solids and increases the capacity without the need for new clarifiers. InDENSE is easily integrated into any existing plant and offers a rapid return on investment.

“Our team views wastewater treatment differently and isn’t satisfied with the status quo,” said Dan Dair, vice president of innovation of World Water Works. “The inDENSE technology is being met with such enthusiasm that a number of papers were presented at WEFTEC 2016 on two facilities located in Virginia”

This technology can be quickly and easily implemented on existing clarifiers to achieve results with little to no significant infrastructure modification or construction. Early adopters of this technology have witnessed not only significant reductions in SVI, but dramatically improved consistencies throughout seasonal changes.

InDENSE is an important part of World Water Works’ WaterEnergy™ series of products - Doing More, With Less, In Less™.

About World Water Works, Inc.

World Water Works is a leading manufacturer of specialized process and wastewater treatment technologies. With a focus on cost effective performance, flexibility, and durability, the company partners with clients to identify and create the most appropriate water treatment solutions. Since its founding in 1998, the company’s technology has cleaned more than 15 trillion gallons of water, facilitated the reuse of more than 2.5 trillion gallons and recovered millions of pounds of resources. For more information visit WorldWaterWorks.com.